"You know, those of us involved in the afrofuturist debate feel partly responsible for the coming of the afropolitic. I want to try and rescue something from it, for a minute, by returning to that debate on “futurority” which afrofuturism is about. If you remember… neither term, either afro or futurist, were indeed new."
John Akomfrah, Manifesa #17: Raimi Gbadamosi talks with John Akomfrah on Contemporary& (via studiomuseum)

(via studiomuseum)

studiomuseum:

This the final week of The Shadows Took Shape, catch this exhibition before it closes March 9th!
Image: (Top) Laylah Ali, Untitled, 2005. Courtesy the artist(Bottom) Laylah Ali, Untitled, 2005. Courtesy Currier Museum of Art, Manchester, NH; Museum Purchase: the Henry Melville Fuller Acquisition Fund
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studiomuseum:

This the final week of The Shadows Took Shape, catch this exhibition before it closes March 9th!
Image: (Top) Laylah Ali, Untitled, 2005. Courtesy the artist(Bottom) Laylah Ali, Untitled, 2005. Courtesy Currier Museum of Art, Manchester, NH; Museum Purchase: the Henry Melville Fuller Acquisition Fund
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studiomuseum:

This the final week of The Shadows Took Shape, catch this exhibition before it closes March 9th!

Image:
(Top) Laylah Ali, Untitled, 2005. Courtesy the artist
(Bottom) Laylah Ali, 
Untitled, 2005. Courtesy Currier Museum of Art, Manchester, NH; Museum Purchase: the Henry Melville Fuller Acquisition Fund

Source: studiomuseum

studiomuseum:

Jeff Wall
After “Invisible Man” by Ralph Ellison, the Prologue, 2000
Silver dye bleach transparency; aluminum light box, 5 ft. 8 1/2 in. x 8 ft. 2 3/4 in. (174 x 250.8 cm)

Saturday, March 1st, we’re partnering with The Schomburg Center to present Ellison at 100: Reading Invisible Man. This week we’ll be sharing our favorite Ralph Ellison or Invisible Man quotes or artwork using #Ellison100. Stay tuned and use the hashtag to share your favorite quotes and artwork too!

Source: moma.org

studiomuseum:

TIM ROLLINS and K.O.S.
Invisible Man (after Ralph Ellison), 2008
matte acrylic and book pages on canvas
24 x 24 inches
61 x 61 cm
LM11968

Saturday, March 1st, we’re partnering with The Schomburg Center to present Ellison at 100: Reading Invisible Man. This week we’ll be sharing our favorite Ralph Ellison or Invisible Man quotes or artwork using #Ellison100. Stay tuned and use the hashtag to share your favorite quotes and artwork too!

Source: lehmannmaupin.com

A new video game, Assassin’s Creed: Liberation, is set in 18th Century Louisiana and features the Creole heroine Aveline de Grandpré, who infiltrates plantations, fights masters and incites riots in her missions.
“‘Blackness can be a sort of performance,’ wrote the Kotaku writer Evan Narcisse, who has championed Assassin’s Creed: Liberation, as well as advocated more sophisticated portrayals of African-Americans in video games in general. Liberation makes that metaphor literal, by letting Aveline adopt personas that give her varying abilities and constraints. The ‘lady,’ who dresses and acts like the wealthy free woman that Aveline is, can fool men by charming them and is less likely to be noticed by the guards in the game — but she can’t climb buildings and is weak in a fight. The slave — Aveline disguises herself as one, while she and her white stepmother work to free others — can infiltrate areas under cover of labor. And the assassin persona is, well, less concerned with the historical basis of double consciousness.”
Full article: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/28/arts/video-games/assassins-creed-liberation-examines-colonial-blacks.html?ref=arts
ZoomInfo
A new video game, Assassin’s Creed: Liberation, is set in 18th Century Louisiana and features the Creole heroine Aveline de Grandpré, who infiltrates plantations, fights masters and incites riots in her missions.
“‘Blackness can be a sort of performance,’ wrote the Kotaku writer Evan Narcisse, who has championed Assassin’s Creed: Liberation, as well as advocated more sophisticated portrayals of African-Americans in video games in general. Liberation makes that metaphor literal, by letting Aveline adopt personas that give her varying abilities and constraints. The ‘lady,’ who dresses and acts like the wealthy free woman that Aveline is, can fool men by charming them and is less likely to be noticed by the guards in the game — but she can’t climb buildings and is weak in a fight. The slave — Aveline disguises herself as one, while she and her white stepmother work to free others — can infiltrate areas under cover of labor. And the assassin persona is, well, less concerned with the historical basis of double consciousness.”
Full article: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/28/arts/video-games/assassins-creed-liberation-examines-colonial-blacks.html?ref=arts
ZoomInfo

A new video game, Assassin’s Creed: Liberation, is set in 18th Century Louisiana and features the Creole heroine Aveline de Grandpré, who infiltrates plantations, fights masters and incites riots in her missions.

“‘Blackness can be a sort of performance,’ wrote the Kotaku writer Evan Narcisse, who has championed Assassin’s Creed: Liberation, as well as advocated more sophisticated portrayals of African-Americans in video games in general. Liberation makes that metaphor literal, by letting Aveline adopt personas that give her varying abilities and constraints. The ‘lady,’ who dresses and acts like the wealthy free woman that Aveline is, can fool men by charming them and is less likely to be noticed by the guards in the game — but she can’t climb buildings and is weak in a fight. The slave — Aveline disguises herself as one, while she and her white stepmother work to free others — can infiltrate areas under cover of labor. And the assassin persona is, well, less concerned with the historical basis of double consciousness.”

Full article: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/28/arts/video-games/assassins-creed-liberation-examines-colonial-blacks.html?ref=arts

6assassin's creed, Games, video games, afrofuturism, studio museum, studio museum in harlem,

Happy Valentine’s Day, swing by the museum at 6pm for Double Vision!
Two films, The Wiz (1971) and The Brother from Another Planet (1984) will be screened at the same time, preceded by an informative artist-led tour of The Shadows Took Shape!
Refreshments will be provided. RSVP at studiomuseum.org. 
Who doesn’t love an afrofuturist?!
Please note: Brother from Another Planet is intended for audiences ages 17 and up.
ZoomInfo
Happy Valentine’s Day, swing by the museum at 6pm for Double Vision!
Two films, The Wiz (1971) and The Brother from Another Planet (1984) will be screened at the same time, preceded by an informative artist-led tour of The Shadows Took Shape!
Refreshments will be provided. RSVP at studiomuseum.org. 
Who doesn’t love an afrofuturist?!
Please note: Brother from Another Planet is intended for audiences ages 17 and up.
ZoomInfo

Happy Valentine’s Day, swing by the museum at 6pm for Double Vision!

Two films, The Wiz (1971) and The Brother from Another Planet (1984) will be screened at the same time, preceded by an informative artist-led tour of The Shadows Took Shape!

Refreshments will be provided. RSVP at studiomuseum.org. 

Who doesn’t love an afrofuturist?!

Please note: Brother from Another Planet is intended for audiences ages 17 and up.

6afrofuturism, studio museum in harlem, shadows took shape, teen program, the wiz, brother from another planet, film,

Black History to Black Futurism: Trajecting our Liberation

Black History Month has become a month that is used to share history and knowledge of past leaders, intellectuals, artists and shapers of black life in the Diaspora and the continent. It is a year where we, as a diverse people, collectively celebrate the advancements we have made and track the key moments that have led us to where we are in the present times.

This month is vital to the our continual collective memory, which contributes to never forgetting the brutality and horrors we faced in various locations across the world and how we defiantly and creatively resist the powers who try to succumb us to the belief that there are no possibilities of freedom and liberation. Of course, it is important that we do not fall into essentialized definitions of “black” and “African.” For the purposes of this article, I am speaking of people of Afro-descent living in North America (particularly Canadian), as our condition, which is also complicated and complex, is also very much different of Afro/Black experiences in other regions of the world. Read more

Source: forharriet.com

6afrofuturism, shadows took shape, News, black history month,

Black Aquatic and Afrofuturism Slideshow & Playlist

beautone:

Here are the slides for my presentation from the Black Aquatic and Afrofuturism panel last Thursday at the Studio Museum of Harlem:

Black Aquatic Slideshow

Spotify Playlist 

A great recap of the panel by afutureancient with links to many of the discussed works can be found here:

http://afutureancient.tumblr.com/post/76056864144/modern-griots-recap-the-black-aquatic-and

Source: beautone

6art, shadaws took shape, afrofuturism,

shadowstookshape:

Join The Shadows Took Shape book club Sunday, February 23, 2014 at 4pm

In honor of the major group exhibition The Shadows Took Shape, please join The Studio Museum for a new series of book club discussions moderated by prominent artists, scholars, and bloggers interested in science fiction and speculative literature. The moderator for Colson Whitehead's The Intuitionist is Jeffrey Allen Tucker, Director of the Frederick Douglass Institute for African & African-American Studies at the University of Rochester.

The Intuitionist is set in the curious world of elevator inspection, portrays a universe parallel to our own, where matters of morality, politics, and race reveal unexpected ironies. This novel takes place in a city full of skyscrapers and other buildings requiring vertical transportation in the form of elevators. The time, never identified explicitly, is one when black people are called “colored” and integration is a current topic. The protagonist is Lila Mae Watson, an elevator inspector of the “Intuitionist” school. The Intuitionists practice an inspecting method by which they ride in an elevator and intuit the state of the elevator and its related systems. The competing school, the “Empiricists,” insists upon traditional instrument-based verification of the condition of the elevator. Watson is the second black inspector and the first black female inspector in the city.

Jeffrey Allen Tucker is Associate Professor in the Department of English at the University of Rochester, where he teaches courses on 20th-century American and African-American literature.  He is the author of A Sense of Wonder:  Samuel R. Delany, Race, and Identity (Wesleyan Press, 2004) and co-editor of Race Consciousness:  African-American Studies for the New Century (New York University Press, 1997).  He also has written essays on George S. Schuyler, Octavia E. Butler, and Colson Whitehead.  His most recent publication is “‘A Sort of Double Writing’:  They Fly at Çiron’s Generic Identities” (American Literary History 24.4, 2012), addresses a 1971 short story that was co-composed by Samuel R. Delany and re-published as a novel in 1993.  Tucker is a contributor to the forthcoming Cambridge Companion to Slavery in American Literature and is working on a collection of interviews conducted with John A. Williams by himself and others.

(via shadowstookshape)

Source: studiomuseum.org

6Lit,

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